Trials and Errors and Errors and Errors

In early October I began to make what felt like my first real progress on the house. I had a stack of lumber delivered to my house and it was time to start framing.

Hopeful Beginnings

It seemed as if this stage would be quick and easy. In one afternoon, my father and I busted out one of the long walls and laid out most of the second.

IMG_0442
First wall!

The next morning my parents left to go gallivanting across the United States in their own tiny home/recreational trailer, leaving me to complete the second wall on my own. I was excited. As much as I love working with and learning from my father, I was eager to prove my own capabilities. My last words as my parents pulled away in their truck was “When you get back I will have this frame done and the walls up!” And I truly believed it.

If it took us both a quarter of an afternoon to build one wall, then I decided it would take me a full day to finish the one we had already started. I fully anticipated being able to gather a party to raise walls by the following week.

Reality is about to wipe that Can-Do Attitude right off my face.
Reality is about to wipe that Can-Do Attitude right off my face.

Reality Hits

But I knew after the very first afternoon that this was going to be a longer endeavor than I anticipated. For that afternoon and several afternoons after, I pulled more nails than I left in… by a lot.

The Graveyard of Nails
The Graveyard of Nails
Someday I will get it right...
Someday I will get it right…

For my dear readers to understand the magnitude of my struggle, I am presenting to you all a list of mistakes you can make while framing, a list which has been thoroughly tested and not at all approved by yours truly!

Ways to F *** Up While Framing

  1. You can nail the wrong piece
  2. You can nail the right piece in the wrong place
  3. You can nail the right piece in the right place in the wrong order
  4. You can nail the right piece in the right place in the right order but not have checked to make sure it was level with the piece it was attached to
  5. You can nail in the right piece in the right place in the right order and have made sure it was level only to discover that the board was more twisted than you realized and won’t nail in correctly on the other end
  6. You can try to leverage this twisted piece in to place and look up to realize that you have now leveraged it out of place on the opposite end
  7. After double checking for right pieces, places, order, levelness, and twistedness, you can finally have an entire section of wall together and realize that you cut a piece slightly too short
  8. Alternatively, you can nearly complete a section and realize it was all measured all wrong in the first place.
  9. Now that you’re angry, you can drive that stupid nail in so hard it cracks the lumber.
  10. Or you can drive a nail in at the wrong angle and bend it to hell.
  11. Or even better you can miss the nail entirely and slam that hate fueled hammer right into your thumb and forefinger.
  12. Now while you’re furious about your bent nails and your cracked lumber and your possibly broken fingers, you can jam your crowbar in with far too much fervor and further crack the piece you’re trying to remove and every piece in the vicinity.
  13. You can repeat these mistakes over and over and over again until it takes you an entire month of working tirelessly on every day off and some mornings before your night job to complete something that you thought would take one little 8 hour work day to knock out.

There are my mistakes. I hope this inspires you to go out and cuss at your own projects.

IMG_0520
In the above photo I have just made mistake #1 on my list.

When I decided to take on the 160House I knew it wouldn’t be easy but I did think that my glowing intelligence and positive attitude would make for a quick learning curve. After spending four weeks making and remaking mistakes and practicing my most colorful language skills, I now know that I am going to have to ride this out on pure stubbornness. No matter. I have plenty of that.

Things did eventually pick up. After 4 work days of absolute struggle, I finally started to leave in more nails than I pulled and I stopped having to yell at the wood so much. Eventually I did finish that wall and was ready to gather friends for a good old fashioned barn raising.

The Raising of the Wall

Many heroes showed up at my house that hope-filled Wednesday. My sister and little nephew came to cheerlead and take photos, and my friends Kurt, Ejay, Kate, and my partner Joe came to do the heavy lifting. Together we heaved the surprisingly heavy wall over to the trailer and set it down. An end piece cracked off and fell to the ground. Bad omens (or workmanship but let’s say omens).

Carter is here to help.
Carter is here to help.
Carter is very helpful.
Carter is very helpful.
12175910_490000647848111_311721155_o - Edited
Wobbling our way to the trailer.

After attaching a new piece where the other had fallen, we had to strategize. First, problem was that it appeared that the wall, when lifted, would collide with one of the trees beside the trailer. The second problem was that if we pushed the wall any closer to the edge, there wouldn’t be any room for it to slip and it could fall off of the trailer.

We ended up pulling several wooden saw horses to the side of the trailer and lifting the wall on top of those. The plan was to drag the wall back to the trailer and then prop it up quickly by attaching a piece of wood to the tree and wall. (My quickly rejected suggestion was that we attach boards to the trailer as stoppers and just try lifting it to see if it would actually hit the tree. Remember this because I will briefly gloat about it later)

The plan at first seemed to be working. With a little will power and grunting, we got the thing upright, but as quickly as we got it up, things started to go horribly wrong. One of the saw horses began to sink into the ground, tipping backwards. The bottom of the wall started to slip out, causing the top to tip back down towards us. Panic ensued as we simultaneously reconciled with our own mortalities and refused to relinquish our delicate holds on life. We used our superhuman, near death experience strength to keep from being crushed, setting the wall back where we started.

This would have been our success photo.
This would have been our success photo.

For some reason, everyone wanted to go home after I almost killed them.

I probably should have felt more disappointed but mostly I was just thankful that nobody had been hurt and proud of myself and my friends for trying.

The Raising of the Wall Take 2

My dad came home the next day and was nice about not mocking me for my overzealous declaration.

A few days after he returned, just the two of us used a pulley system to get the first wall up. It took about an hour and there were no near death experiences. (For the record, I would like to say that we put a board down to keep the wall from sliding and that the wall didn’t even come close to hitting the tree when we lifted it so I am smart and everyone should listen to everything I say. See, I told you there would be brief gloating).

My turn!
My turn!
Don't look OSHA.
Don’t look OSHA.

It was just one wall but it’s my wall. I made it and I lifted it, all with the help of my amazingly supportive friends and family. I am so proud of myself and thankful for my community.

Ready to move in!
Ready to move in!

So THANK YOU to my Dad for being my teacher and making things look so damn easy, to my Mom for photographing our framing day, to my sister Andra for photographing our wall raising day, to my nephew Carter for being our adorable wall raising mascot, and thank you infinitely to my friends Ejay, Kurt, and Kate and my wonderful partner Joe for their time, hard work, and misplaced trust. This would not be possible without all of your love, support, and efforts.

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